Best Top Ten Reciprocating Saw In The Market

Reciprocating saws come in different designs that range widely in speed, power and other features. They range from less powerful portable that are ideal for simple task to powerful model as well as corded models that are ideal for heavy construction and demolition that work in tight spaces.


Every time we think what is the best Reciprocating Saw before making purchase.  Here, we take a look at ten best reciprocating saw for your work to be done successfully.


Top 10 list of Best Reciprocating Saw

How to Change Circular Saw Blade

A circular saw is one of the most turned to power tools in the industry. With the capacity to cut just about any material and to cut it just about any way you need it cut, circular saws are some of the most universally useful and commonly used power tools on the planet. Accordingly, in the interest of different projects or applications, or simply because a certain blade has seen better days, the occasional circular saw blade change is inevitable.

Fortunately, changing the blade on your circular saw is quite a bit easier than you might think. In fact, with just a few simple steps and an adjustable wrench, you can have that blade changed in no time.

As with all other power tool repairs and procedures, the first thing to do to begin your circular saw blade replacement is disengage the tool. Turn the tool off and remove the battery or unplug the tool and ensure the entire cord remains in sight for the duration of the repair.

Lay the saw down on a sturdy surface allowing the blade to hang slightly off the edge of the table. If you have access to clamps, securely clamp the saw to the bench. If not, simply use your weight to secure the saw holding it steady with the saw’s operating handle.

Slide up the protective blade guard and hold it in place, if necessary holding it with the thumb of the hand securing the saw to the table. Slowly rotate the saw blade by hand to locate the blade’s offset hole (a smallish hole drilled through the blade at a point usually not far behind the saw teeth). Insert a standard 3/8″ drill bit (or similarly shaped object) half-way into the offset hole and continue rotating the blade clockwise until the bit hits the saw itself. Although many newer circular saw models feature a blade locking mechanism that would render this step unnecessary, the bit will, nonetheless, keep the blade from moving as you continue with the procedure.

Attach an adjustable wrench to the blade bolt at the center of the saw blade. This bolt holds the blade to the saw and, to ensure the blade remains secured to the saw while the tool is engaged, has a left-handed thread or the opposite thread one is accustomed to. Accordingly, the bolt must be rotated clockwise to be removed. Remove the bolt, remove the bit, and remove the old blade.

Slide the new blade over the saw’s blade hub and, by hand, replace and lightly twist the blade bolt onto the hub. Re-insert the bit into the offset hole and rotate the blade counterclockwise until the bit catches on the saw’s body.

Tighten the bolt firmly by hand before securing it completely with your adjustable wrench, and lastly, plug the saw back in or replace its battery and give the saw spin (carefully) to ensure everything has come back together properly.

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